Author

Anna Woltz

Anna Woltz (b. 1981) writes successfully in various genres and for a range of readers, from a great animal adventure for eight-year-olds like Save My Dog! to a challenging young-adult novel such as Black Box. I Still Can’t Fly, her historical novel for children, won the Thea Beckman Prize, while her award-winning My Particularly Peculiar Week with Tess was described by one newspaper as “universally beautiful writing for children”. Woltz’s books have been translated into German, Danish, Norwegian, Slovene, Hungarian, Japanese, French and English.

My Particularly Peculiar Week with Tess

My Particularly Peculiar Week with Tess

(Querido Kinderboeken, 2013, 167 pages)

How is it possible that Anna Woltz has not yet won any major children’s book awards? Perhaps it’s because she writes small adventures that are deceptively straightforward in their tone. However, the emotional depth that award commit­tees are usually looking for is most definitely present in her work.

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A Hundred Hours of Night

A Hundred Hours of Night

(Querido Kinderboeken, 2014, 216 pages)

Tension and psychology are perfectly balanced in this cinematic young-adult novel. Emilia, a 14-year-old Dutch girl, flies to New York all on her own when it comes out that her father, who also happens to be her school headmaster, has been sending inappropriate text messages to a 17-year-old female student.

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Plaster

Plaster

(Querido, 2015, 166 pages)

Stacks of books have been written about divorce, but rarely as originally as in Plaster. In sparkling dialogue and a tone that is light-hearted yet sharp, Anna Woltz speaks through her character, a quirky twelve-year-old girl, about divorcing parents, broken hearts, a wounded family and hoping against hope.

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Alaska

Alaska

(Querido Kinderboeken, 2016, 192 pages)

After a first disastrous day at school, during which she’s completely humiliated, Parker discovers that her dog, Alaska, is living with the biggest bully in her class. Her family had to let Alaska go because of her brother’s allergy. Parker can’t stand the thought that her beloved Alaska is now an assistance dog for the horrible Sven, who su ers from epileptic fits. So she decides one night to kidnap the dog. Her plan does not go well, and she ends up talking to Sven.

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Translations