Author

Rindert Kromhout

Rindert Kromhout (b. 1958) has been writing children’s books since 1982. Readers who are familiar with the trilogy that Kromhout wrote about the artistic Bloomsbury Group know that if anyone can write convincingly about the past, then it is Kromhout. Part one of this YA trilogy, Soldaten huilen niet (Soldiers Don’t Cry, 2010) thoroughly deserved to win not one but two major awards, the Thea Beckman Prize and the Gouden Lijst. Since 1982, Kromhout has created an extensive and wide-ranging body of work. His style is clear and direct. He has also achieved success with his series of picture books about ‘Little Donkey’, which he makes with illustrator Annemarie van Haeringen.

Soldiers Don’t Cry

Soldiers Don’t Cry

(Leopold, 2010, 266 pages)

During a holiday in England, Rindert Kromhout visited Charleston, the home and meeting place of the writers, artists and academics of the famous Bloomsbury Group. He was captivated. He knew then that he wanted to write a book about this place, about these people. In Soldaten huilen niet (Soldiers Don’t Cry), he reconstructs the history of Quentin and Julian, sons of art critic Clive Bell and artist Vanessa Bell, who, together with her sister, the writer Virginia Woolf, formed the heart of this group of artists.

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That Day in August

That Day in August

(Leopold, 2013, 88 pages)

With a great eye for detail, children’s author Rindert Kromhout and illustrator Annemarie van Haeringen use words and pictures to tell a small but multi-faceted story about a devastating event in an Italian village. However, Die dag in augustus (That Day in August) is not just about how painfully unpredictable life can be. This is first and foremost a tale about how we need stories to survive and to live.

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April is the Cruellest Month

April is the Cruellest Month

(Leopold, 2013, 265 pages)

March 1941. The bombing of London is at its peak when a deeply depressed Vir­ginia Woolf fills her coat pockets with stones and walks into the River Ouse. It is not the first time she has suffered a nervous collapse, but when a bomb destroys the publishing house that she runs with her husband it also wipes out what remains of her faith in humanity.

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A Mann

A Mann

(Leopold, 2016, 384 pages)

Depicting historical reality in a believable way is no easy task. But in Een Mann (A Mann) Rindert Kromhout undeniably proves his skill as a writer. Writing from the perspective of Klaus Mann (1906-1949), he convincingly shares with the reader this author’s difficult coming of age, whose fate and perhaps misfortune was to begin his career in his father’s shadow.

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Translations

Website

http://www.rindertkromhout.nl